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MOA: Fabric of Our Land: Salish Weaving

Sunday November 19
Free admission 12 – 5 p.m.
Remarks and presentations 1:15 p.m.
Join the event on Facebook

Musqueam and the Museum of Anthropology invite you to celebrate the opening of The Fabric of Our Land, an exhibit that will take you on a journey of over 200 years of Salish weaving.

This is a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to see some of the earliest Salish hand-woven blankets in existence. On loan from museums in Europe and the United States, these stunning weavings will give visitors an up-close view of rare Salish designs that we hope inspire you to learn more about the rich histories of this cultural practice.

This exhibit seeks to support contemporary weavers engaged in the ongoing revitalization of Salish weaving. Throughout the duration of the exhibit, visitors will have opportunities to experience weaving by trying it themselves. This exhibit will be on view in MOA’s Audain Gallery from November 19 2017 to April 15 2018.

$2 PARKING: Use coupon code FABRIC at the pay station from 12 p.m. onward.

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ITCNOV

November Indigenous Talking Circle

The Aboriginal Gathering Place + Emily Carr Students’ Union are hosting another Indigenous Talking Circle for the Fall semester. Join us for respectful conversation and bannock & jam. Wednesday, November 15 at 11:30am Aboriginal Gathering Place.

Panelists include: Mark Igloliorte, Lacie Burning and Marc Williams.

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Mark Igloliorte: sightlines and surfaces

In preparation for several major projects this fall, boundary pushing Vancouver-based painter Mark Igliolorte discusses his ongoing research into the Indigenous origins of the kayak, the beauty in shifting perspectives and collapsing the vast distance between coasts. Through the careful observation of sightlines and surfaces, Igliolorte’s art makes visible the latent Indigeneity of skateboards and kayaks in his ongoing and lived practice that reframes cultural histories and sense of place.

Read full article here : http://iaq.inuitartfoundation.org/29-3-sightlines-and-surfaces/

IMG_2198-CMYK-398x530Mark Igloliorte MyYellow Aquanaut 17’ 7” (View with artist standing on skateboard), 2016, Cut grippe on skateboard deck. Photo courtesy the artist.

Cover image: Temporary Studio, 2016, Aboriginal Gathering Place – Emily Carr University of Art + Design. Photo courtesy the artist.

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Shuvinai Ashoona

Aboriginal Gathering Place Speaker Series

We are very pleased to present artist  Shuvinai Ashoona!
Aboriginal Gathering Place Speaker Series
Join us at the AGP on Wednesday October 11, 2:30-3:30pm.

Shuvinai Ashoona was born in 1961 in Cape Dorset on Baffin Island. She is the daughter of the well-known sculptor Kiawak Ashoona and granddaughter of the late Pitseolak Ashoona, the great graphic artist. Her own career started in the mid-1990s when she began making drawings for the West Baffin Eskimo Cooperative. Often startlingly different from other Cape Dorset graphic expression, her works have not always been readily accepted by collectors of Inuit art. Nevertheless, in recent years Ashoona’s reputation as a contemporary artist has steadily grown.

Ashoona’s first works were small monochromatic ink drawings depicting the land. Many of these works show receding expanses of rocky tundra with sparse vegetation; streams run over the land in some images, often turning into small waterfalls. Although a few works show a horizon, the majority look down upon the landscape from a nearly aerial, closed off perspective. Atmospheric and delicately detailed, these early drawings are often characterized by a subtle eeriness.

In the late 1990s, Ashoona’s images became less naturalistic and darker in mood. Works based more on imagination than on observation of the physical world started to appear, suggesting a strong inner vision. Many drawings from this period portray subterrnean caverns littered with boulders and spanned by twisting formations. Darkened or illuminated tunnels also appear frequently, as do step- and shelf-like forms. These psychologically charged works are densely and sometimes obsessively drawn. Recently, Ashoona has started to use a range of colour in her images, depicting people and common objects but in her own unique vision, often including textual commentary. While lighter in mood, these works remain obliquely representational in a manner distinctly hers.

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PB

Pushing Boundaries Exhibition

This biennial exhibition showcases and celebrates contemporary local, national and international First Nations artists. Through carvings, portraiture drawings, digital images, textile work, video and more, themes of family, reconciliation, indigenous life, gender, race, politics and nature are explored.

Artists:

Arlene Bowman, Allison Burns, Krystle Coughlin, Alanna Edwards, Dan Friday, Geronimo, Whess Harman, Adele Maskwa-iskwew Arseneau, Shelley McDonald, Ryan McKenna, Levi Nelson, Jacqueline Primeau, Michelle Sound

North Vancouver Community Arts Council

Located at
CityScape Community Art Space
335 Lonsdale Avenue
North Vancouver, BC
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Crimp in the Fabric: Situating Painting Today

Crimp in the Fabric: Situating Painting Today

This symposium is an opportunity for artists, writers, curators, students, educators and thinkers to come together, and question the relevance and importance of painting today. It will be an opportunity to listen to and discuss issues arising from various and diverse artistic positions represented by panelists, in the context of the many concurrent painting exhibitions occurring throughout Vancouver.
https://crimpinthefabric.ca/

Panel including ECU faculty Mark Igloliorte: September 29, SFU Woodwards

Like Hands Stuck in a Mattress: The Difficulty of Talking Painting

Asks the questions: How to talk about painting? How not to talk about painting? And given that painting is the most important thing that painters do, (why) should painters talk about painting anyway?

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Alumnus + Assistant Professor Raymond Boisjoly Shortlisted for AMIA AGO Photography Prize

Emily Carr University is pleased to share news of alumnus + Assistant Professor Raymond Boisjoly’s selection as one of four international finalists for the 2017 Aimia | AGO Photography Prize, marking the 10th anniversary of Canada’s most significant award for photography.

Co-presented by Aimia, the Canadian global leader in data-driven marketing and loyalty analytics, and the Art Gallery of Ontario (AGO), the Prize awards $50,000 to a winner selected by public vote. The four finalists will present their work in an exhibition opening September 6, 2017 at the AGO in Toronto. Voting begins in person at the AGO after the exhibition opens and on the Prize’s website beginning on September. 13, 2017.

Raymond Boisjoly is an Indigenous artist of Haida and Québécois descent who lives and works in Vancouver. He has exhibited extensively across Canada and internationally in both solo and group exhibitions. Boisjoly investigates the ways images, objects, materials and language continue to define Indigenous art and artists, with particular attention to colonial contexts. In 2016, he was a recipient of the VIVA Award, presented by the Jack and Doris Shadbolt Foundation for the Visual Arts in Vancouver, and is one of five artists shortlisted for the 2017 Sobey Art Award. Boisjoly is an Assistant Professor of Interdisciplinary Studio in the Audain Faculty of Art at Emily Carr University of Art and Design. He is represented by Catriona Jeffries Gallery.
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Aboriginal Gathering Place moving

The current AGP location on Granville island will be permanently closed starting Thursday, August 3 and reopen for staff and faculty at the new campus on Monday, August 21.

Students will have card access to the AGP only after they have received their student cards during their scheduled orientations September 5-8.

The new Emily Carr campus is located at 520 East 1st Avenue, Vancouver.

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Unsettling Colonial Gender Boundaries

Third year ECU Visual Arts student Lacie Kanerahtahsóhon Burning will be co-curating Unsettling Colonial Gender Boundaries with June Scudeler for Queer Arts Festival in partnership with Vancouver Indigenous Media Arts Festival.

Unsettling Colonial Gender Boundaries is the media art component of the festival that will feature commissioned works by Thirza Cuthand (ECU alumna) and Chandra Melting Tallow, as well as past work by Kent Monkman and Raven Davis.

After the show, Lindsay Nixon, Indigenous Editor-at-large for Canadian Art will moderate a panel discussion.

Unsettling Colonial Gender Boundaries
June 23 | 7:00pm | Roundhouse
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