All posts by msound

Myre-Decolonial-Gesture-or-Doing-it-Wrong-Refair-le-chemin-2016”.-Courtesy-McCord-Museum-Montreal.-Photo-Marilyn-Aitken-x-895

Emily Carr Alumni and Faculty to Receive REVEAL Indigenous Art Awards

Several Emily Carr alumni and faculty will soon be receiving an award unlike any seen before in Canada. Created by the Hnatyshyn Foundation, the REVEAL Indigenous Art Awards are intended to honour emerging and established Indigenous artists and to fuel future Indigenous arts practice. Recipients will each receive a one-time award of $10,000.

Of the 150 artists selected, eight are Emily Carr alumni and faculty. The recipients were chosen by a national jury of peers and include visual artists, media artists, craftspeople, musicians, writers, storytellers, dancers and actors.

The winners will receive their awards on May 22 at a special ceremony in Winnipeg that will include National Chief Perry Bellegarde, Winnipeg mayor Brian Bowman and Canada Council CEO Simon Brault.

Join us in congratulating Sonny Assu (2002), Liz Carter (current student), Thirza Cuthand (2005), Mark Igloliorte (Assistant Professor, Faculty of Visual Art + Material Practice), Mary Longman (1989), Nadia Myre (1997), Janice Toulouse (1979 and Sessional Faculty) and Niki Watts (2016).

Find out more about the REVEAL Indigenous Art Awards here.

Cover Image: Decolonial Gesture or Doing it Wrong? Refair le chemin, 2016. Nadia Myre.

Share
ABORIGINALARTSHOW-33OUTLINED11x17-01

Annual Aboriginal Student Exhibition

Annual Aboriginal Student Exhibition
Re-Forming
March 24-April 3, 2017

Opening Reception
Friday, March 24 4:30-6:30pm
Concourse Gallery

Curatorial Brief:
Re-Forming desires to play on the word “form” as an aesthetic critique of a creative work while proposing a reformulation of fixed understandings of aesthetic as it relates to Indigenous artists and subject matter. As a suggestive device, this title asks the viewer to deepen their consideration of “what it means to be an Indigenous artist” versus “what it means to make art of Indigenous subject matter”, and to thoughtfully re-form initial, predetermined perspectives into something more generative and open. The process of re-forming as a practice in itself encourages an enriched critical engagement with the subtleties and nuances that exist for Indigenous artists and their creative practices. We want to highlight how Indigenous people are engaging with the reformation of culture, languages, politics and creative aesthetic and how that reformation allows a necessary shift in the relationships that our audiences have with us, our art and each other in the context of contemporary art.

This Years Student Curatorial Team:
Mallory Amirault -Mi’kmaq Metis
Nicole Preissl- Stolo
Veronica Danes- Gitxsan
Michelle Williams- Haida

ABORIGINALARTSHOW-33OUTLINED11x17-01

Share
205__600xfloat=left_shawnhunt

Shawn Hunt

Aboriginal Gathering Place Speaker Series

We are very pleased to present artist Shawn Hunt!
Aboriginal Gathering Place Speaker Series
Join us at the AGP on Friday March 10, 11:30-1pm.

Shawn Hunt was born in Vancouver Canada in 1975. He is an artist of Heiltsuk, French and Scottish ancestry. Shawn has a diploma in studio art from Capilano College as well as a BFA from the University of British Columbia where he majored in sculpture and drawing.

His father is Bradley Hunt, a prominent Heiltsuk artist with whom Shawn apprenticed for 5 yrs, learning wood and jewelry carving as well as traditional design. Shawn apprenticed with Coast Salish painter Lawrence Paul Yuxweluptun from 2012 to 2015.
His most recent exhibition Line as Language was at Burrard Arts Foundation, Vancouver and he has exhibited nationally and internationally.

http://www.shawnhunt.net/

image5

Share
C3hcamsUYAEEcB3.jpg_large

Kwèykw`áystway Visual Arts Exhibition

The 2017 Talking Stick Festival theme Kwèykw`áystway serves as inspiration for finding a wide variety of works by a number of artists whose visual practice communicates across media, Nations and generations.

Featuring a collection of artworks from 11 multidisciplinary artists of Indigenous ancestry, the exhibition Kwèykw`áystway: Speaking With One Another attempts to create generative spaces for contemplation and conversation using the variety of expression found in Indigenous art today. The Roundhouse Community Centre serves as the meeting place for you, the audience, to witness some of the voices belonging to the Indigenous arts community.

This exhibition includes a number of artists who come from varying areas of British Columbia or reside here. It seems only fitting to use the festival theme as the title for this show because it is this place – the unceded territory of the Coast Salish Nations – that brings us together today in celebration of art and culture. By using a language belonging to this region we recognize the traditional territory and deepen our relationship to the land around us.

Includes Emily Carr alumni and students:
Bracken Hanuse Corlett, Richard Heikkila-Sawan, Edwin Neel,
Levi Nelson, and Michelle Sound.

Opening & Reception
February 15th, 2017
7:00 PM

Exhibition
February 16-25, 2017
All Day

LOCATION: Roundhouse Exhibition Hall
(181 Roundhouse Mews, Vancouver, BC V6Z 2W3

C3hcamsUYAEEcB3.jpg_large

Share
b9d7db43e001eced6356e6c062a6c1bc

Terrance Houle

Aboriginal Gathering Place Speaker Series

We are very pleased to present  Terrance Houle!
Aboriginal Gathering Place Speaker Series
Join us at the AGP on Thursday February 16, 11:30am.

Born in Calgary, Alberta, Canada and raised on the Great Plains of North America, Terrance Houle is an internationally recognized interdisciplinary media artist and a proud member of the Kainai Nation (Blood Tribe).

Involved with Aboriginal communities all his life, he has traveled to reservations throughout North America participating in Powwow dancing and native ceremonies. Houle makes use of performance, photography, video & film, music and painting in his work. Likewise, Houle’s practice includes various tools of mass dissemination such as billboards and vinyl bus signage. ​

Houle graduated from the Alberta College of Art and Design in 2003 with a BFA Major in Fibre. His groundbreaking art quickly garnered him significant accolades and opportunities:

In 2003, Houle received an invitation to participate in the Thematic Residency at the Banff Centre for the Arts. This residency’s focus was on 34 international Indigenous people, exploring issues of colonization and communion.

In 2004, his work in short video & film presented was awarded Winner of Best Experimental Film at the Toronto ImagineNATIVE Film Festival.

In 2006, Houle received the Enbridge Emerging Artist Award, presented at the mayor’s luncheon for the arts.

Houle’s work has been exhibited across Canada, the United States, Australia, the UK and Europe.

Terrance Houle’s first major solo exhibition, GIVN’R, opened at PLUG-IN Institute for Contemporary Art in Winnipeg, Manitoba. GIVN’R is a small retro-exhibition of Terrance’s works in film, video, performance, installation, mixed media, and photography between the years of 2003 to 2009. ​

Houle lives and maintains his art practice in Calgary.

ba18d8e83001495c5fd4f8a660b17667

Share
Photo6

What’s At Stake? Intertextual Indigenous Knowledges

Saturday, February 4, 2017
12:00 PM – 5:00 PM
World Art Centre, SFU, 149 West Hastings, Vancouver

What’s At Stake? Intertextual Indigenous Knowledges is an afternoon of talks, panels and a spoken word performance that examines knowledge, power, authority, and sovereignty in the construction of artistic practices.

Following on Intertextual: Art in Dialogue, a roving reading group that was held at participating galleries over the last year, this program is meant to function less like a syllabus and more like a web of ideas. Taking the critical historiography of Native Art of the Northwest Coast: A Changing History of Ideas (UBC Press, 2013) as a point of provocation, this event belongs to an intertextual discussion of artistic practice and the role of art institutions (from artist-run centres to public gallery models) in Vancouver.

Intertextual aims to examine/critique and create/support a community based in text, recognizing the process of selection and concomitant erasure that occurs in any process of representation.

Beginning with a welcome by Musqueam artist and knowledge keeper Debra Sparrow and concluding with a spoken word performance by Nuu-chah-nulth/Kwakwaka’wakw poet Valeen Jules, the afternoon features talks by notable cultural figures involved in Indigenous art: art historian Charlotte Townsend Gault, Nuu-chah-nulth historian, poet and artist Ron Hamilton (Ki-Ke-In), Kwakwaka’wakw artist, activist and scholar Marianne Nicolson, and Cree curator and scholar Richard Hill, Canada Research Chair at Emily Carr University of Art and Design. In addition, a lively discussion between Vancouver Indigenous scholars, curators and artists – Lindsay Lachance, Jordan Wilson, Jeneen Frei Nijootli and Jennifer Kramer – promises to be a highlight.

This series has been produced with the participation of SFU Galleries, Bill Reid Gallery of Northwest Coast Art, Contemporary Art Gallery, grunt gallery, Morris and Helen Belkin Art Gallery, Museum of Anthropology, Presentation House Gallery, UBC Press, Vancouver Art Gallery, and Western Front.

Share
Stewartk-01-Holiday

Kim Stewart

Aboriginal Gathering Place Speaker Series

Living Labs and the Aboriginal Gathering Place are pleased to welcome artist-in-residence Kim Stewart to Emily Carr in February as a part of our ongoing series Along a North-South Axis, presented in partnership with Two Rivers Gallery in Prince George, BC.

Join us at the AGP on Wednesday February 22, 11:30-12:30pm.
Future Self: The Creative Transformation of a Pop Culture Indian
Open studios daily – February 21 – 25, 2017

Kim Stewart has been working in the field of visual arts for more than 20 years. Born in the Athabasca, AB area, she is a descendant of a Canadian Métis Fur Trade family with Scottish, French, European and Cree ancestry. Kim is interested in exploring cultural adaptation and singular v.s. group identity through her studio practice. She often combines traditional aboriginal art forms, historical documents, photos and contemporary art disciplines in her work to help illuminate and reconstruct stories, opinions, and values from her past. Kim has earned diplomas in Fine Art, Graphic Design and Illustration and holds a Masters Degree from SFU in Art Education. Along with her artistic practice, Kim teaches visual arts at a College in Prince George, BC.

Along a North South Axis is a series of talks in Vancouver and Prince George co-presented by Two Rivers Gallery and Emily Carr University of Art + Design.

KimStewart-800x981

Top Image: Holiday – woven blanket wall hanging

Share
file

Heather Igloliorte

Aboriginal Gathering Place Speaker Series

We are very pleased to present  Heather Igloliorte!
Aboriginal Gathering Place Speaker Series
Join us at the AGP on Friday February 24, 11:30-1pm.

Heather Igloliorte (Inuit, Nunatsiavut Territory of Labrador) is an Assistant Professor of Aboriginal art history at Concordia University in Montreal, Quebec.

Heather’s teaching and research interests center on Inuit and other Native North American visual and material culture, circumpolar art studies, performance and media art, the global exhibition of Indigenous arts and culture, and issues of colonization, sovereignty, resistance and resilience. Some of her recent publications related to this work include chapters and catalogue essays in Manifestations: New Native Art Criticism (2012); Changing Hands: Art Without Reservation 3 (2012); Curating Difficult Knowledge (2011); Native American Art At Dartmouth: Highlights from the Hood Museum of Art (2011); Inuit Modern (2010); Response, Responsibility, and Renewal: Canada’s Truth and Reconciliation Journey (2009); and Negotiations in a Vacant Lot: Studying the Visual in Canada (forthcoming, 2014). She is also an active independent curator. One of her current projects is the reinstallation of the permanent collection of Inuit art at the Musée National des Beaux-Arts du Québec. Other recent curatorial projects include aboDIGITAL: The Art of Jordan Bennett (2012), Decolonize Me (Ottawa Art Gallery, 2011 – 2015), and “we were so far away”: The Inuit Experience of Residential Schools (Legacy of Hope Foundation, 2009 – ongoing).  Igloliorte served as an Executive Member of the Board of Directors for the Aboriginal Curatorial Collective (2005 – 2011) and as the President of Gallery 101 (Ottawa, 2009 – 2011); she currently serves on the Board of Directors for North America’s largest Indigenous art historical association, the Native North American Art Studies Association, and was recently appointed to the Board of Directors of the Otsego Institute for Native American Art History at the Fenimore Art Museum in Cooperstown, New York. She also serves on the Indigenous Advisory Council of the Canadian Museum for Human Rights (opening 2014) and regularly contributes to other Aboriginal arts and cultural organizations.

Igloliorte completed her phd in Cultural Mediations at Carleton University’s Institute for Comparative Studies in Literature, Art and Culture (ICSLAC); her dissertation contributes the first art history of the Nunatsiavummiut, focusing on over 400 years of post-contact production, Nunatsiavummi Sananguagusigisimajangit / Nunatsiavut Art History:  Continuity, Resilience, and Transformation in Inuit Art (2013). She is currently working with the Nunatsiavut Territory to bring the arts and culture of the Nunatsiavummiut (Labrador Inuit) to light through several ongoing and multiplatform collaborative community-based projects. One of these is projects, the creation of a large scale touring exhibition of Nunatsiavut contemporary art, is being coordinated through the SSHRC Partnership Grant Mobilizing Inuit Cultural Heritage: a multi-media / multi-platform re-engagement of voice in visual art and performance (2013 – 2017).

Please note: Heather will be also give a presentation in the Lecture Hall, room 301 SB, on February 23 at 7pm.

Share