Category Archives: News and Events

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Crimp in the Fabric: Situating Painting Today

Crimp in the Fabric: Situating Painting Today

This symposium is an opportunity for artists, writers, curators, students, educators and thinkers to come together, and question the relevance and importance of painting today. It will be an opportunity to listen to and discuss issues arising from various and diverse artistic positions represented by panelists, in the context of the many concurrent painting exhibitions occurring throughout Vancouver.
https://crimpinthefabric.ca/

Panel including ECU faculty Mark Igloliorte: September 29, SFU Woodwards

Like Hands Stuck in a Mattress: The Difficulty of Talking Painting

Asks the questions: How to talk about painting? How not to talk about painting? And given that painting is the most important thing that painters do, (why) should painters talk about painting anyway?

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Alumnus + Assistant Professor Raymond Boisjoly Shortlisted for AMIA AGO Photography Prize

Emily Carr University is pleased to share news of alumnus + Assistant Professor Raymond Boisjoly’s selection as one of four international finalists for the 2017 Aimia | AGO Photography Prize, marking the 10th anniversary of Canada’s most significant award for photography.

Co-presented by Aimia, the Canadian global leader in data-driven marketing and loyalty analytics, and the Art Gallery of Ontario (AGO), the Prize awards $50,000 to a winner selected by public vote. The four finalists will present their work in an exhibition opening September 6, 2017 at the AGO in Toronto. Voting begins in person at the AGO after the exhibition opens and on the Prize’s website beginning on September. 13, 2017.

Raymond Boisjoly is an Indigenous artist of Haida and Québécois descent who lives and works in Vancouver. He has exhibited extensively across Canada and internationally in both solo and group exhibitions. Boisjoly investigates the ways images, objects, materials and language continue to define Indigenous art and artists, with particular attention to colonial contexts. In 2016, he was a recipient of the VIVA Award, presented by the Jack and Doris Shadbolt Foundation for the Visual Arts in Vancouver, and is one of five artists shortlisted for the 2017 Sobey Art Award. Boisjoly is an Assistant Professor of Interdisciplinary Studio in the Audain Faculty of Art at Emily Carr University of Art and Design. He is represented by Catriona Jeffries Gallery.
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Aboriginal Gathering Place moving

The current AGP location on Granville island will be permanently closed starting Thursday, August 3 and reopen for staff and faculty at the new campus on Monday, August 21.

Students will have card access to the AGP only after they have received their student cards during their scheduled orientations September 5-8.

The new Emily Carr campus is located at 520 East 1st Avenue, Vancouver.

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Unsettling Colonial Gender Boundaries

Third year ECU Visual Arts student Lacie Kanerahtahsóhon Burning will be co-curating Unsettling Colonial Gender Boundaries with June Scudeler for Queer Arts Festival in partnership with Vancouver Indigenous Media Arts Festival.

Unsettling Colonial Gender Boundaries is the media art component of the festival that will feature commissioned works by Thirza Cuthand (ECU alumna) and Chandra Melting Tallow, as well as past work by Kent Monkman and Raven Davis.

After the show, Lindsay Nixon, Indigenous Editor-at-large for Canadian Art will moderate a panel discussion.

Unsettling Colonial Gender Boundaries
June 23 | 7:00pm | Roundhouse
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Yaxkasei (William Callaghan) Memorial Award Endowed Fund

Emily Carr University of Art and Design has established the Yaxkasei (William Callaghan) Memorial Award Endowed Fund.  The award will be given to an Emily Carr student of Aboriginal ancestry wishing to enroll in a credit summer program course. The award will directly cover the cost of the student’s tuition and any remaining amount may be used for materials and supplies.

Yaxkasei, whose name means “can see a long way” was a third year Emily Carr student at the time of his tragic passing. Yaxkasei touched many lives in his short 33 years, including his four nephews, and was a beloved mentor and leader to Aboriginal students. Long-time Emily Carr community members Gaye Fowler and John Wertschek have established this award in honour of their friendship and respect for William “Yaxkasei” Callaghan, and Emily Carr University matched their contribution.

William

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Aboriginal Alumni Longlisted for 2017 Sobey Art Award

The Sobey Art Foundation and the National Gallery of Canada today announced the longlist of nominees for the 2017 Sobey Art Award.
The Sobey Art Award is presented annually to a Canadian artist aged 40 and under who has exhibited in a public or commercial art gallery within 18 months of being nominated.
These 25 longlisted artists—five for each of five regions—are vying are for the top prize worth $50,000. Each of four other finalists will receive $10,000.
A related shortlist of five artists will be released on June 6, with the top winner of the prize being announced on October 25 in Toronto.

Congratulations to our Aboriginal Alumni on the longlist!

Jeneen Frei Njootli (2012)

Raymond Boisjoly (2006 | Assistant Professor, Audain Faculty Art)

Jeneen Frei Njootli is a Vuntut Gwich’in artist and a founding member of the ReMatriate Collective. In her interdisciplinary practice she uses media such as performance, sound and textiles. Much of her work deconstructs the history of the materials she uses. She investigates their relationship to trade, ceremonial regalia, and the politics of First Nations art. Her work is now in the Vancouver Art Gallery’s permanent collection.

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Raymond Boisjoly is an Indigenous artist of Haida and Québécois descent who lives and works in Vancouver. His work investigates technology, Aboriginal identity, the relationship between text and image as well as the limits of the visible. He is an Assistant Professor in the Audain Faculty of Art at Emily Carr University of Art + Design.

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Edgar Heap of Birds to receive 2017 Honourary Doctorate

Each year the Honorary Doctorate Degree Program celebrates and recognizes the commitment, dedication, and service of individuals who are distinguished by their significant contributions and sustained creative and philanthropic achievements in their areas of expertise.

For over four decades, Hock E Aye Vi Edgar Heap of Birds has created visual works that deliver critiques on colonization, modernity, identity and power. A member of the Cheyenne and Arapaho tribes, he received a BFA from the University of Kansas, and an MFA from the Tyler School of Art in Philadelphia. Heap of Birds boasts an extensive exhibition record, including the Venice Biennale, and his works are held in the collections of major museums throughout North America including the Whitney, the Smithsonian, the MET, British Museum, and the Library of Congress.

A Professor of Native American Studies at the University of Oklahoma, Heap of Birds has served as a visiting lecturer and professor at numerous universities around the world, including Rhode Island School of Design and Yale University. His artistic creations and efforts as an advocate for indigenous communities worldwide are focused first upon social justice and then the personal freedom to live within the tribal circle as an expressive individual.

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Emily Carr Alumni and Faculty to Receive REVEAL Indigenous Art Awards

Several Emily Carr alumni and faculty will soon be receiving an award unlike any seen before in Canada. Created by the Hnatyshyn Foundation, the REVEAL Indigenous Art Awards are intended to honour emerging and established Indigenous artists and to fuel future Indigenous arts practice. Recipients will each receive a one-time award of $10,000.

Of the 150 artists selected, eight are Emily Carr alumni and faculty. The recipients were chosen by a national jury of peers and include visual artists, media artists, craftspeople, musicians, writers, storytellers, dancers and actors.

The winners will receive their awards on May 22 at a special ceremony in Winnipeg that will include National Chief Perry Bellegarde, Winnipeg mayor Brian Bowman and Canada Council CEO Simon Brault.

Join us in congratulating Sonny Assu (2002), Liz Carter (current student), Thirza Cuthand (2005), Mark Igloliorte (Assistant Professor, Faculty of Visual Art + Material Practice), Mary Longman (1989), Nadia Myre (1997), Janice Toulouse (1979 and Sessional Faculty) and Niki Watts (2016).

Find out more about the REVEAL Indigenous Art Awards here.

Cover Image: Decolonial Gesture or Doing it Wrong? Refair le chemin, 2016. Nadia Myre.

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Annual Aboriginal Student Exhibition

Annual Aboriginal Student Exhibition
Re-Forming
March 24-April 3, 2017

Opening Reception
Friday, March 24 4:30-6:30pm
Concourse Gallery

Curatorial Brief:
Re-Forming desires to play on the word “form” as an aesthetic critique of a creative work while proposing a reformulation of fixed understandings of aesthetic as it relates to Indigenous artists and subject matter. As a suggestive device, this title asks the viewer to deepen their consideration of “what it means to be an Indigenous artist” versus “what it means to make art of Indigenous subject matter”, and to thoughtfully re-form initial, predetermined perspectives into something more generative and open. The process of re-forming as a practice in itself encourages an enriched critical engagement with the subtleties and nuances that exist for Indigenous artists and their creative practices. We want to highlight how Indigenous people are engaging with the reformation of culture, languages, politics and creative aesthetic and how that reformation allows a necessary shift in the relationships that our audiences have with us, our art and each other in the context of contemporary art.

This Years Student Curatorial Team:
Mallory Amirault -Mi’kmaq Metis
Nicole Preissl- Stolo
Veronica Danes- Gitxsan
Michelle Williams- Haida

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