Tag Archives: exhibitions

TalkingStickFestival2018-3

Scháyilhen Visual Arts Exhibition

Salmon Going Up River (Scháyilhen) immediately invokes a sense of urgency, of struggle, of passion. Questions arise: is it about the journey, the destination, the mission, or is the motive of greatest significance? Is failure an option?

Twelve Indigenous artists have been gathered to address the notion of Salmon Going Up River. From Danielle Bobier’s inorganic grid-lines and circular pools evocative of the built environment in Catchment Area (2017) routed from salvaged mahogany plywood; to Shain Jackson’s twenty-foot natural and painted red cedar with abalone inlay Legacy salmon sculpture; and collections of found objects as in Jay Haven’s Bargain Hunter made from bags gathered from retail stores on reserves throughout British Columbia—themes and stories begin to unravel.
Within a climate of reconciliation, the metaphor of Salmon Going Up River speaks about remembering, of going home—it’s about the future and of survival. It is directional, of going forward by way of the past. Yet, the past at best serves as a guidepost. The journey is arduous and painful, fraught with seemingly impossible barriers demanding multiple attempts to overcome—bruises and battle scars added at each rung. Fight we must, but with each other? Is the river and its many obstacles not battle enough?
There are resting pools along the way—so easy to linger; to set up residence. Complacency threatens. And so the conversation begins.

Richard Heikkilä-Sawan exhibition curator, Talking Stick Festival 2018

Artists:

Danielle Bobier | Destanie Clayton | Brenda Crabtree | Jay Havens | Shain Jackson |  Maynard Johnny | Cheyenne Rain LeGrande ᑭᒥᐊᐧᐣ | Corey Moraes | Kajola Morewood |
Lou-ann Neel | Levi Nelson | Michelle Sound

Dates & Time:
Opening & Reception: February 14, 2018 @ 7pm
Exhibition: February 14-24, 2018, 10am – 10pm
Location:
Roundhouse Performance Centre (181 Roundhouse Mews, Vancouver, BC V6Z 2W3)

TalkingStickFestival2018-3

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Maureen Gruben QULLIQ: In Darkness, Light

Maureen Gruben
QULLIQ: In Darkness, Light

2 February to 15 April 2018
Opening Reception Thursday, Feb 1 at 7:30 pm
Artist walk-through Friday, Feb 2 at 12:00 pm

The Libby Leshgold Gallery is pleased to present QULLIQ: In Darkness, Light, a solo exhibition of new work by Maureen Gruben. The qulliq is a traditional oil lamp that was once the heart of the home. It was used to heat, to cook and to bring continuous light during the darkness of the Arctic winter. The new work included in this exhibition explores notions of light and transparency related to the light of the oil lamp as well as the translucence of ice.

Gruben forges critical links between threatened Arctic lands and communities, and international environmental and human conditions through disassembling and re-forming polar bear fur, moose hides, seal skins, gathered kelp. In her work, abstraction of form sits in active tension with the acutely ‘real’ presence of her geographically and culturally embedded mediums.

Gruben spent much of her childhood sewing with her mother, who was a seamstress, and trapping with her father. She has a tacit knowledge of Arctic land and the rich but increasingly precarious resources it offers. Frequently addressing themes such as Persistent Organic Pollutants (POPs), melting ice, and the rights of indigenous hunters to maintain their way of life, Gruben’s practice is permeated with activism while at the same time allowing generous room for her materials themselves to speak. While referring explicitly inwards to localised acts of hunting, gathering, communal preparation and sharing—and even to individual animals—her work, equally, extends decisively outwards, exploring new visual languages that offer compelling and often urgent global associations.

Maureen Gruben is based in Victoria, BC and Tuktoyaktuk, NWT. She was born in Tuktoyaktuk and studied at Kelowna Okanagan College of Fine Arts (Diploma in Fine Arts, 1990), the Enʼowkin Centre in Penticton (Diploma in Fine Arts and Creative Writing, 2000 and Certificate in Indigenous Political Development & Leadership, 2001), and University of Victoria (BFA, 2012). She has been recognized by Kelownaʼs En’owkin Centre with both their Eliza Jane Maracle Award (1998/99) and their Overall Achievement Award (1999/2000). In 2011 she was awarded the Elizabeth Valentine Prangnell Scholarship Award from the University of Victoria. Gruben has most recently exhibited in the group shows Blink at University of Victoria (2012) and Custom Made at Kamloops Art Gallery (2015), 150 Acts: Art, Activism, Impact at Art Gallery of Guelph (2017-18), and as part of Landmarks/Reperes2017; her first solo show, UNGALAQ (When Stakes Come Loose) opened at Vancouver’s grunt gallery in 2017.

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Pushing Boundaries Exhibition

This biennial exhibition showcases and celebrates contemporary local, national and international First Nations artists. Through carvings, portraiture drawings, digital images, textile work, video and more, themes of family, reconciliation, indigenous life, gender, race, politics and nature are explored.

Artists:

Arlene Bowman, Allison Burns, Krystle Coughlin, Alanna Edwards, Dan Friday, Geronimo, Whess Harman, Adele Maskwa-iskwew Arseneau, Shelley McDonald, Ryan McKenna, Levi Nelson, Jacqueline Primeau, Michelle Sound

North Vancouver Community Arts Council

Located at
CityScape Community Art Space
335 Lonsdale Avenue
North Vancouver, BC
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Unsettling Colonial Gender Boundaries

Third year ECU Visual Arts student Lacie Kanerahtahsóhon Burning will be co-curating Unsettling Colonial Gender Boundaries with June Scudeler for Queer Arts Festival in partnership with Vancouver Indigenous Media Arts Festival.

Unsettling Colonial Gender Boundaries is the media art component of the festival that will feature commissioned works by Thirza Cuthand (ECU alumna) and Chandra Melting Tallow, as well as past work by Kent Monkman and Raven Davis.

After the show, Lindsay Nixon, Indigenous Editor-at-large for Canadian Art will moderate a panel discussion.

Unsettling Colonial Gender Boundaries
June 23 | 7:00pm | Roundhouse
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Kwèykw`áystway Visual Arts Exhibition

The 2017 Talking Stick Festival theme Kwèykw`áystway serves as inspiration for finding a wide variety of works by a number of artists whose visual practice communicates across media, Nations and generations.

Featuring a collection of artworks from 11 multidisciplinary artists of Indigenous ancestry, the exhibition Kwèykw`áystway: Speaking With One Another attempts to create generative spaces for contemplation and conversation using the variety of expression found in Indigenous art today. The Roundhouse Community Centre serves as the meeting place for you, the audience, to witness some of the voices belonging to the Indigenous arts community.

This exhibition includes a number of artists who come from varying areas of British Columbia or reside here. It seems only fitting to use the festival theme as the title for this show because it is this place – the unceded territory of the Coast Salish Nations – that brings us together today in celebration of art and culture. By using a language belonging to this region we recognize the traditional territory and deepen our relationship to the land around us.

Includes Emily Carr alumni and students:
Bracken Hanuse Corlett, Richard Heikkila-Sawan, Edwin Neel,
Levi Nelson, and Michelle Sound.

Opening & Reception
February 15th, 2017
7:00 PM

Exhibition
February 16-25, 2017
All Day

LOCATION: Roundhouse Exhibition Hall
(181 Roundhouse Mews, Vancouver, BC V6Z 2W3

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Vancouver Special: Ambivalent Pleasures

Vancouver Special: Ambivalent Pleasures
December 3, 2016 to April 17, 2017

The Vancouver Art Gallery is pleased to launch Vancouver Special, a triennial exhibition surveying contemporary art in Vancouver. Co-curated by Daina Augaitis and Jesse McKee, Ambivalent Pleasures, the first iteration within this series, assesses the arts activity and discourse in the city over the last five years. Presenting works by forty artists, the exhibition encompasses a range of approaches and reinvigorated explorations of surrealism, abstraction, atemporality and conceptual practices.

Artists:
Derya Akay | Maya Beaudry | Raymond Boisjoly | Eli Bornowsky | Rebecca Brewer | Colleen Brown | Matt Browning | Mark Delong | Kim Dorland | Barry DoupÉ | Michael Drebert | Julia Feyrer | Jeneen Frei Njootli | Tamara Henderson | Colleen Heslin | Julian Hou | Allison Hrabluik | Gareth James | Garry Neill Kennedy | Tiziana La Melia | Khan Lee | Arvo Leo | Lyse Lemieux | Glenn Lewis | Anne Low | Elizabeth McIntosh | Jordan Milner | Antoni Oko | Ryan Peter | Sylvain Sailly | Rachelle Sawatsky | Walter Scott | Krista Belle Stewart | Angela Teng | Mina Totino | Ron Tran | Tristan Unrau | Charlene Vickers | Brent Wadden | Alison Yip

Cover Image:Accumulation of Moments Spent Underwater With the Sun and Moon by Charlene Vickers is one of the works in Vancouver Special: Ambivalent Pleasures. Trevor Mills, Vancouver Art Gallery

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We Come to Witness: Sonny Assu in Dialogue with Emily Carr

We Come to Witness: Sonny Assu in Dialogue with Emily Carr
December 3, 2016 to April 23, 2017

Artist’s Tour: Sonny Assu
We Come to Witness: Sonny Assu in Dialogue with Emily Carr
Saturday December 3, 1pm & 3pm
In the Gallery, 4th floor

Join interdisciplinary artist Sonny Assu for a tour of his exhibition In Dialogue with Emily Carr: Sonny Assu. Challenging the colonial gaze, Assu merges Indigenous
iconography with a pop art sensibility to intervene into the work of Modernist painter Emily Car and her representations of the landscape and First Nations people. Assu will discuss select sculptural works, his ongoing series Interventions on the
Imaginary, which includes digital tags based on a selection of Carr paintings from the Vancouver Art Gallery’s collection and a new collaboration with ceramic artist
Brendan Tang.

Free for Members or with Gallery Admission.
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Sonny Assu
Spaced Invaders, 2014
digital intervention on an Emily Carr Painting (Heina, 1928)
Courtesy of the Artist

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Boarder X

Boarder X
November 19, 2016 to April 23, 2017
Winnipeg Art Gallery

Boarder X features new work by Indigenous artists that use snowboarding, skateboarding, and surfing to demonstrate knowledge and relationships to the land. The artwork reflects cultural, political, environmental, and social perspectives related to the landscapes and territories we occupy. These boarding lifestyles share synergies with Indigeneity, connected by an appreciation for the land and water. The exhibit reveals how culture, art, and board intersect. In this context, board culture works to examine contested spaces, political borders, hybrid identities, and traditional territories.

Artists: Jordan Bennett, Roger Crait, Steven Davies, Mark Igloliorte, Mason Mashon, Meghann O’Brien, and Les Ramsay

Curated by Jaimie Isaac, WAG Curatorial Resident of Indigenous & Contemporary Art

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Screens and Thresholds

October 7 – December 4, 2016
Screens and Thresholds
Curated by Raymond Boisjoly

Friday, October 7, 7 PM:  Introduction with Raymond Boisjoly, Tricia Livingston, and Krista Belle Stewart, followed by opening reception

Thursday, October 13, 8 PM: Sound performance by Postcommodity

“Screens and Thresholds” considers the impact of mediation on our understanding of history and experience. Diverse works in photography, video, and installation are brought together to examine the anxieties and possibilities in visualizing cultural knowledge—from the limits of scientific objectivity, to the ways knowledge is transferred from one person to another, to the persistence of certain practices in changing circumstances. The exhibition highlights the processes of transformation, not simply their results; in this way, the works may be framed as “medial,” situated somewhere between a beginning and an end. “Screens and Thresholds” features the work of Scott Benesiinaabandan, Tricia Livingston, Mike MacDonald, Karthik Pandian, Krista Belle Stewart, and the art collective Postcommodity.

Raymond Boisjoly has exhibited widely across Canada and internationally. He received the 2016 VIVA Award and was also shortlisted for this year’s Sobey Art Prize. He is an Assistant Professor at Emily Carr University of Art and Design.

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Karthik Pandian, Oversight, (2011)

Cover Image, Scott Benesiinaabandan: little resistances: marylezin, 2015, digital media

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Raymond Boisjoly Exhibition

Raymond Boisjoly
Catriona Jeffries
16 September – 29 October, 2016
Opening reception: Thursday, 15 September, 7-9pm

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Matter out of place and out of time. Raymond Boisjoly’s most recent body of work, Discrepants, circulates around textual figures of temporal and spatial displacements. It is presented together with the correlating series “From age to age, as its shape slowly unraveled…” and a related exterior artwork on the side of the gallery itself. This constellation of works considers Sculptures Also Die, a 1953 anti-colonial film by Chris Marker, Alain Resnais, and Ghislain Cloquet, which poetically articulates what occurs when we come to look at African statuary as simply aesthetic objects. Art is presented as a category convenient to western thinking through which immense things can be reduced to manageable dimensions.

Boisjoly’s interest in the film Sculptures Also Die is in the way it mediates objects and focuses on how works by non-western peoples come to be understood as art. The work in the exhibition suggests the importance of looking at how this historical trajectory can be considered more broadly. From this general situation, and from his own specific position as an indigenous person, the artist considers that these same processes and transformations occur to the material of his own people. For historical example, totem poles of the Northwest Coast were cut down like trees and shipped to institutions all over the world, into a museological state they were never meant to be seen in.

Materially, all of the works in the exhibition use commercial consumer printing services rather than art printing. From inkjet ink on adhesive backed vinyl, to UV ink on flat vinyl with grommets, to exterior vinyl on aluminum frame. In order to foreground the existence of images culturally outside the bounded, if expanding realm of art, these printing methods concern the contingent character of art and its attendant practices.

For the project of “From age to age, as its shape slowly unraveled…”, Boisjoly began with a technique he has used previously, playing a video of the film on an iPhone, placing it on a scanner, which attempts to capture the image as it is moving, which of course is futile. This strategy creates strange, distorted, partial images that are outputted to large, adhesive inkjet on vinyl murals that are applied directly to the gallery walls. These create an alternate relationship to the exhibition space, in that they cannot be taken off the wall and moved around. To take them off the wall is to ultimately change them permanently. Instead of simply re-presenting historical images, this work draws attention to the method and time of its own altered transmission, implicating us in the creation of meaning in the present.

In this, there is an anxiety of the visual, the “thing” is never presented to you fully. While there are things that can be named in terms of recognizable imagery, there is obviously missing information. The text in the Discrepants series functions as a kind of withholding, manifesting a differing anxiety about imagery. It uses ambiguous statements that are in effect reflections on the general premise of the printed images. They are an attempt to discuss, as opposed to leaving them as images or simply as pictures. They reflect the discursive aspect of the image, where the images cannot speak in that way, offering a different entry point to a shared concern. Surrounding the text, Boisjoly has incorporated images of clouds and television noise. As a complex aggregate, a clouds existence and form is determined as multiple parts coalesce, water droplets combining to form vapor, similar in structure to complex social and cultural phenomena. The artist asks us to consider the film as a model for discrepancy, how we can imagine the possibilities of difference, and the future of the discrepant.

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