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Mark Igloliorte: sightlines and surfaces

In preparation for several major projects this fall, boundary pushing Vancouver-based painter Mark Igliolorte discusses his ongoing research into the Indigenous origins of the kayak, the beauty in shifting perspectives and collapsing the vast distance between coasts. Through the careful observation of sightlines and surfaces, Igliolorte’s art makes visible the latent Indigeneity of skateboards and kayaks in his ongoing and lived practice that reframes cultural histories and sense of place.

Read full article here : http://iaq.inuitartfoundation.org/29-3-sightlines-and-surfaces/

IMG_2198-CMYK-398x530Mark Igloliorte MyYellow Aquanaut 17’ 7” (View with artist standing on skateboard), 2016, Cut grippe on skateboard deck. Photo courtesy the artist.

Cover image: Temporary Studio, 2016, Aboriginal Gathering Place – Emily Carr University of Art + Design. Photo courtesy the artist.

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Crimp in the Fabric: Situating Painting Today

Crimp in the Fabric: Situating Painting Today

This symposium is an opportunity for artists, writers, curators, students, educators and thinkers to come together, and question the relevance and importance of painting today. It will be an opportunity to listen to and discuss issues arising from various and diverse artistic positions represented by panelists, in the context of the many concurrent painting exhibitions occurring throughout Vancouver.
https://crimpinthefabric.ca/

Panel including ECU faculty Mark Igloliorte: September 29, SFU Woodwards

Like Hands Stuck in a Mattress: The Difficulty of Talking Painting

Asks the questions: How to talk about painting? How not to talk about painting? And given that painting is the most important thing that painters do, (why) should painters talk about painting anyway?

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Alumnus + Assistant Professor Raymond Boisjoly Shortlisted for AMIA AGO Photography Prize

Emily Carr University is pleased to share news of alumnus + Assistant Professor Raymond Boisjoly’s selection as one of four international finalists for the 2017 Aimia | AGO Photography Prize, marking the 10th anniversary of Canada’s most significant award for photography.

Co-presented by Aimia, the Canadian global leader in data-driven marketing and loyalty analytics, and the Art Gallery of Ontario (AGO), the Prize awards $50,000 to a winner selected by public vote. The four finalists will present their work in an exhibition opening September 6, 2017 at the AGO in Toronto. Voting begins in person at the AGO after the exhibition opens and on the Prize’s website beginning on September. 13, 2017.

Raymond Boisjoly is an Indigenous artist of Haida and Québécois descent who lives and works in Vancouver. He has exhibited extensively across Canada and internationally in both solo and group exhibitions. Boisjoly investigates the ways images, objects, materials and language continue to define Indigenous art and artists, with particular attention to colonial contexts. In 2016, he was a recipient of the VIVA Award, presented by the Jack and Doris Shadbolt Foundation for the Visual Arts in Vancouver, and is one of five artists shortlisted for the 2017 Sobey Art Award. Boisjoly is an Assistant Professor of Interdisciplinary Studio in the Audain Faculty of Art at Emily Carr University of Art and Design. He is represented by Catriona Jeffries Gallery.
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Aboriginal Alumni Longlisted for 2017 Sobey Art Award

The Sobey Art Foundation and the National Gallery of Canada today announced the longlist of nominees for the 2017 Sobey Art Award.
The Sobey Art Award is presented annually to a Canadian artist aged 40 and under who has exhibited in a public or commercial art gallery within 18 months of being nominated.
These 25 longlisted artists—five for each of five regions—are vying are for the top prize worth $50,000. Each of four other finalists will receive $10,000.
A related shortlist of five artists will be released on June 6, with the top winner of the prize being announced on October 25 in Toronto.

Congratulations to our Aboriginal Alumni on the longlist!

Jeneen Frei Njootli (2012)

Raymond Boisjoly (2006 | Assistant Professor, Audain Faculty Art)

Jeneen Frei Njootli is a Vuntut Gwich’in artist and a founding member of the ReMatriate Collective. In her interdisciplinary practice she uses media such as performance, sound and textiles. Much of her work deconstructs the history of the materials she uses. She investigates their relationship to trade, ceremonial regalia, and the politics of First Nations art. Her work is now in the Vancouver Art Gallery’s permanent collection.

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Raymond Boisjoly is an Indigenous artist of Haida and Québécois descent who lives and works in Vancouver. His work investigates technology, Aboriginal identity, the relationship between text and image as well as the limits of the visible. He is an Assistant Professor in the Audain Faculty of Art at Emily Carr University of Art + Design.

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Emily Carr Alumni and Faculty to Receive REVEAL Indigenous Art Awards

Several Emily Carr alumni and faculty will soon be receiving an award unlike any seen before in Canada. Created by the Hnatyshyn Foundation, the REVEAL Indigenous Art Awards are intended to honour emerging and established Indigenous artists and to fuel future Indigenous arts practice. Recipients will each receive a one-time award of $10,000.

Of the 150 artists selected, eight are Emily Carr alumni and faculty. The recipients were chosen by a national jury of peers and include visual artists, media artists, craftspeople, musicians, writers, storytellers, dancers and actors.

The winners will receive their awards on May 22 at a special ceremony in Winnipeg that will include National Chief Perry Bellegarde, Winnipeg mayor Brian Bowman and Canada Council CEO Simon Brault.

Join us in congratulating Sonny Assu (2002), Liz Carter (current student), Thirza Cuthand (2005), Mark Igloliorte (Assistant Professor, Faculty of Visual Art + Material Practice), Mary Longman (1989), Nadia Myre (1997), Janice Toulouse (1979 and Sessional Faculty) and Niki Watts (2016).

Find out more about the REVEAL Indigenous Art Awards here.

Cover Image: Decolonial Gesture or Doing it Wrong? Refair le chemin, 2016. Nadia Myre.

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Vancouver Special: Ambivalent Pleasures

Vancouver Special: Ambivalent Pleasures
December 3, 2016 to April 17, 2017

The Vancouver Art Gallery is pleased to launch Vancouver Special, a triennial exhibition surveying contemporary art in Vancouver. Co-curated by Daina Augaitis and Jesse McKee, Ambivalent Pleasures, the first iteration within this series, assesses the arts activity and discourse in the city over the last five years. Presenting works by forty artists, the exhibition encompasses a range of approaches and reinvigorated explorations of surrealism, abstraction, atemporality and conceptual practices.

Artists:
Derya Akay | Maya Beaudry | Raymond Boisjoly | Eli Bornowsky | Rebecca Brewer | Colleen Brown | Matt Browning | Mark Delong | Kim Dorland | Barry DoupÉ | Michael Drebert | Julia Feyrer | Jeneen Frei Njootli | Tamara Henderson | Colleen Heslin | Julian Hou | Allison Hrabluik | Gareth James | Garry Neill Kennedy | Tiziana La Melia | Khan Lee | Arvo Leo | Lyse Lemieux | Glenn Lewis | Anne Low | Elizabeth McIntosh | Jordan Milner | Antoni Oko | Ryan Peter | Sylvain Sailly | Rachelle Sawatsky | Walter Scott | Krista Belle Stewart | Angela Teng | Mina Totino | Ron Tran | Tristan Unrau | Charlene Vickers | Brent Wadden | Alison Yip

Cover Image:Accumulation of Moments Spent Underwater With the Sun and Moon by Charlene Vickers is one of the works in Vancouver Special: Ambivalent Pleasures. Trevor Mills, Vancouver Art Gallery

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Boarder X

Boarder X
November 19, 2016 to April 23, 2017
Winnipeg Art Gallery

Boarder X features new work by Indigenous artists that use snowboarding, skateboarding, and surfing to demonstrate knowledge and relationships to the land. The artwork reflects cultural, political, environmental, and social perspectives related to the landscapes and territories we occupy. These boarding lifestyles share synergies with Indigeneity, connected by an appreciation for the land and water. The exhibit reveals how culture, art, and board intersect. In this context, board culture works to examine contested spaces, political borders, hybrid identities, and traditional territories.

Artists: Jordan Bennett, Roger Crait, Steven Davies, Mark Igloliorte, Mason Mashon, Meghann O’Brien, and Les Ramsay

Curated by Jaimie Isaac, WAG Curatorial Resident of Indigenous & Contemporary Art

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Screens and Thresholds

October 7 – December 4, 2016
Screens and Thresholds
Curated by Raymond Boisjoly

Friday, October 7, 7 PM:  Introduction with Raymond Boisjoly, Tricia Livingston, and Krista Belle Stewart, followed by opening reception

Thursday, October 13, 8 PM: Sound performance by Postcommodity

“Screens and Thresholds” considers the impact of mediation on our understanding of history and experience. Diverse works in photography, video, and installation are brought together to examine the anxieties and possibilities in visualizing cultural knowledge—from the limits of scientific objectivity, to the ways knowledge is transferred from one person to another, to the persistence of certain practices in changing circumstances. The exhibition highlights the processes of transformation, not simply their results; in this way, the works may be framed as “medial,” situated somewhere between a beginning and an end. “Screens and Thresholds” features the work of Scott Benesiinaabandan, Tricia Livingston, Mike MacDonald, Karthik Pandian, Krista Belle Stewart, and the art collective Postcommodity.

Raymond Boisjoly has exhibited widely across Canada and internationally. He received the 2016 VIVA Award and was also shortlisted for this year’s Sobey Art Prize. He is an Assistant Professor at Emily Carr University of Art and Design.

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Karthik Pandian, Oversight, (2011)

Cover Image, Scott Benesiinaabandan: little resistances: marylezin, 2015, digital media

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Raymond Boisjoly Exhibition

Raymond Boisjoly
Catriona Jeffries
16 September – 29 October, 2016
Opening reception: Thursday, 15 September, 7-9pm

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Matter out of place and out of time. Raymond Boisjoly’s most recent body of work, Discrepants, circulates around textual figures of temporal and spatial displacements. It is presented together with the correlating series “From age to age, as its shape slowly unraveled…” and a related exterior artwork on the side of the gallery itself. This constellation of works considers Sculptures Also Die, a 1953 anti-colonial film by Chris Marker, Alain Resnais, and Ghislain Cloquet, which poetically articulates what occurs when we come to look at African statuary as simply aesthetic objects. Art is presented as a category convenient to western thinking through which immense things can be reduced to manageable dimensions.

Boisjoly’s interest in the film Sculptures Also Die is in the way it mediates objects and focuses on how works by non-western peoples come to be understood as art. The work in the exhibition suggests the importance of looking at how this historical trajectory can be considered more broadly. From this general situation, and from his own specific position as an indigenous person, the artist considers that these same processes and transformations occur to the material of his own people. For historical example, totem poles of the Northwest Coast were cut down like trees and shipped to institutions all over the world, into a museological state they were never meant to be seen in.

Materially, all of the works in the exhibition use commercial consumer printing services rather than art printing. From inkjet ink on adhesive backed vinyl, to UV ink on flat vinyl with grommets, to exterior vinyl on aluminum frame. In order to foreground the existence of images culturally outside the bounded, if expanding realm of art, these printing methods concern the contingent character of art and its attendant practices.

For the project of “From age to age, as its shape slowly unraveled…”, Boisjoly began with a technique he has used previously, playing a video of the film on an iPhone, placing it on a scanner, which attempts to capture the image as it is moving, which of course is futile. This strategy creates strange, distorted, partial images that are outputted to large, adhesive inkjet on vinyl murals that are applied directly to the gallery walls. These create an alternate relationship to the exhibition space, in that they cannot be taken off the wall and moved around. To take them off the wall is to ultimately change them permanently. Instead of simply re-presenting historical images, this work draws attention to the method and time of its own altered transmission, implicating us in the creation of meaning in the present.

In this, there is an anxiety of the visual, the “thing” is never presented to you fully. While there are things that can be named in terms of recognizable imagery, there is obviously missing information. The text in the Discrepants series functions as a kind of withholding, manifesting a differing anxiety about imagery. It uses ambiguous statements that are in effect reflections on the general premise of the printed images. They are an attempt to discuss, as opposed to leaving them as images or simply as pictures. They reflect the discursive aspect of the image, where the images cannot speak in that way, offering a different entry point to a shared concern. Surrounding the text, Boisjoly has incorporated images of clouds and television noise. As a complex aggregate, a clouds existence and form is determined as multiple parts coalesce, water droplets combining to form vapor, similar in structure to complex social and cultural phenomena. The artist asks us to consider the film as a model for discrepancy, how we can imagine the possibilities of difference, and the future of the discrepant.

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Raymond Boisjoly shortlisted for 2015 Sobey art award

Created in 2002 by the Sobey Art Foundation, the Sobey Art Award is Canada’s preeminent award for contemporary Canadian art. The annual $50,000 prize is given to an artist under 40 who has exhibited in a public generic viagra or commercial art gallery within 18 months of being nominated.
The 2015 Shortlist, announced June 3, 2015, includes alumnus Raymond Boisjoly (’06), representing the West Coast and the Yukon. Raymond is an Indigenous artist of Haida and Quebecois descent from Chilliwack, BC. He has previously taught at Emily Carr as cialis super active sessional faculty and we’re pleased to announce he australian pharmacy degree canada will join us August 1 as Assistant Professor genericcialis-rxtopstore.com in the Faculty of Visual Art and Material Practice, Audain School of Visual Arts.
Raymond is the recipient of the Fleck Fellowship at the Banff Centre (2010), and has exhibited locally at SFU Gallery, Contemporary Art Gallery and Catriona Jeffries Gallery, where he is currently cialis for bph reviews represented.
The 2015 Sobey Art Award winner will be announced at a gala event on October cialis 20 mg bottle 28, 2015.

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