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What’s At Stake? Intertextual Indigenous Knowledges

Saturday, February 4, 2017
12:00 PM – 5:00 PM
World Art Centre, SFU, 149 West Hastings, Vancouver

What’s At Stake? Intertextual Indigenous Knowledges is an afternoon of talks, panels and a spoken word performance that examines knowledge, power, authority, and sovereignty in the construction of artistic practices.

Following on Intertextual: Art in Dialogue, a roving reading group that was held at participating galleries over the last year, this program is meant to function less like a syllabus and more like a web of ideas. Taking the critical historiography of Native Art of the Northwest Coast: A Changing History of Ideas (UBC Press, 2013) as a point of provocation, this event belongs to an intertextual discussion of artistic practice and the role of art institutions (from artist-run centres to public gallery models) in Vancouver.

Intertextual aims to examine/critique and create/support a community based in text, recognizing the process of selection and concomitant erasure that occurs in any process of representation.

Beginning with a welcome by Musqueam artist and knowledge keeper Debra Sparrow and concluding with a spoken word performance by Nuu-chah-nulth/Kwakwaka’wakw poet Valeen Jules, the afternoon features talks by notable cultural figures involved in Indigenous art: art historian Charlotte Townsend Gault, Nuu-chah-nulth historian, poet and artist Ron Hamilton (Ki-Ke-In), Kwakwaka’wakw artist, activist and scholar Marianne Nicolson, and Cree curator and scholar Richard Hill, Canada Research Chair at Emily Carr University of Art and Design. In addition, a lively discussion between Vancouver Indigenous scholars, curators and artists – Lindsay Lachance, Jordan Wilson, Jeneen Frei Nijootli and Jennifer Kramer – promises to be a highlight.

This series has been produced with the participation of SFU Galleries, Bill Reid Gallery of Northwest Coast Art, Contemporary Art Gallery, grunt gallery, Morris and Helen Belkin Art Gallery, Museum of Anthropology, Presentation House Gallery, UBC Press, Vancouver Art Gallery, and Western Front.

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Kim Stewart

Aboriginal Gathering Place Speaker Series

We are very pleased to present artist Kim Stewart!
Aboriginal Gathering Place Speaker Series
Join us at the AGP on Wednesday February 22, 11:30-12:30pm.

Kim Stewart has been creating in the field of visual arts for more than 20 years. She is a descendant of a Canadian Métis Fur Trade family. She is interested in exploring cultural adaptation and Métis identity. Her work expresses a strong connection to the land and people in her life. Kim works in diverse art forms from traditional aboriginal art practices like caribou hair tufting and beadwork appliqué to contemporary painting, drawing and textile art. She has earned diplomas in Fine Art, Graphic Design and Illustration and holds a Master’s Degree in Art Education. Along with her artistic practice, Kim teaches visual arts at a college in Northern British Columbia.

me+in+sepia+2015Top Image: Holiday – woven blanket wall hanging

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Heather Igloliorte

Aboriginal Gathering Place Speaker Series

We are very pleased to present  Heather Igloliorte!
Aboriginal Gathering Place Speaker Series
Join us at the AGP on Friday February 24, 11:30-1pm.

Heather Igloliorte (Inuit, Nunatsiavut Territory of Labrador) is an Assistant Professor of Aboriginal art history at Concordia University in Montreal, Quebec.

Heather’s teaching and research interests center on Inuit and other Native North American visual and material culture, circumpolar art studies, performance and media art, the global exhibition of Indigenous arts and culture, and issues of colonization, sovereignty, resistance and resilience. Some of her recent publications related to this work include chapters and catalogue essays in Manifestations: New Native Art Criticism (2012); Changing Hands: Art Without Reservation 3 (2012); Curating Difficult Knowledge (2011); Native American Art At Dartmouth: Highlights from the Hood Museum of Art (2011); Inuit Modern (2010); Response, Responsibility, and Renewal: Canada’s Truth and Reconciliation Journey (2009); and Negotiations in a Vacant Lot: Studying the Visual in Canada (forthcoming, 2014). She is also an active independent curator. One of her current projects is the reinstallation of the permanent collection of Inuit art at the Musée National des Beaux-Arts du Québec. Other recent curatorial projects include aboDIGITAL: The Art of Jordan Bennett (2012), Decolonize Me (Ottawa Art Gallery, 2011 – 2015), and “we were so far away”: The Inuit Experience of Residential Schools (Legacy of Hope Foundation, 2009 – ongoing).  Igloliorte served as an Executive Member of the Board of Directors for the Aboriginal Curatorial Collective (2005 – 2011) and as the President of Gallery 101 (Ottawa, 2009 – 2011); she currently serves on the Board of Directors for North America’s largest Indigenous art historical association, the Native North American Art Studies Association, and was recently appointed to the Board of Directors of the Otsego Institute for Native American Art History at the Fenimore Art Museum in Cooperstown, New York. She also serves on the Indigenous Advisory Council of the Canadian Museum for Human Rights (opening 2014) and regularly contributes to other Aboriginal arts and cultural organizations.

Igloliorte completed her phd in Cultural Mediations at Carleton University’s Institute for Comparative Studies in Literature, Art and Culture (ICSLAC); her dissertation contributes the first art history of the Nunatsiavummiut, focusing on over 400 years of post-contact production, Nunatsiavummi Sananguagusigisimajangit / Nunatsiavut Art History:  Continuity, Resilience, and Transformation in Inuit Art (2013). She is currently working with the Nunatsiavut Territory to bring the arts and culture of the Nunatsiavummiut (Labrador Inuit) to light through several ongoing and multiplatform collaborative community-based projects. One of these is projects, the creation of a large scale touring exhibition of Nunatsiavut contemporary art, is being coordinated through the SSHRC Partnership Grant Mobilizing Inuit Cultural Heritage: a multi-media / multi-platform re-engagement of voice in visual art and performance (2013 – 2017).

Please note: Heather will be also give a presentation in the Lecture Hall, room 301 SB, on February 23 at 7pm.

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Dana Claxton Postponed

Please note that this talk has been postponed until further notice.

Aboriginal Gathering Place Speaker Series

We are very pleased to present artist Dana Claxton!
Aboriginal Gathering Place Speaker Series
Join us at the AGP on —, 2-4pm.

Born of Lakota Sioux descent, Dana Claxton investigates the ongoing impact of colonialism on Aboriginal cultures in North America, primarily through film, video and photography. Her practice investigates beauty, the body, the socio-political and the spiritual. She has exhibited widely, including at the the Museum of Modern Art, the Walker Art Center and the Sundance Film Festival. Her work is in major collections including those of the National Gallery of Canada, the Vancouver Art Gallery and the Canada Council Art Bank, and she has received numerous awards including the VIVA Award from the Doris and Jack Shadbolt Foundation and the Eiteljorg Fellowship from the Eiteljorg Museum. Dana Claxton currently teaches in the Department of Art History, Visual Art and Theory, University of British Columbia.

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Vancouver Special: Ambivalent Pleasures

Vancouver Special: Ambivalent Pleasures
December 3, 2016 to April 17, 2017

The Vancouver Art Gallery is pleased to launch Vancouver Special, a triennial exhibition surveying contemporary art in Vancouver. Co-curated by Daina Augaitis and Jesse McKee, Ambivalent Pleasures, the first iteration within this series, assesses the arts activity and discourse in the city over the last five years. Presenting works by forty artists, the exhibition encompasses a range of approaches and reinvigorated explorations of surrealism, abstraction, atemporality and conceptual practices.

Artists:
Derya Akay | Maya Beaudry | Raymond Boisjoly | Eli Bornowsky | Rebecca Brewer | Colleen Brown | Matt Browning | Mark Delong | Kim Dorland | Barry DoupÉ | Michael Drebert | Julia Feyrer | Jeneen Frei Njootli | Tamara Henderson | Colleen Heslin | Julian Hou | Allison Hrabluik | Gareth James | Garry Neill Kennedy | Tiziana La Melia | Khan Lee | Arvo Leo | Lyse Lemieux | Glenn Lewis | Anne Low | Elizabeth McIntosh | Jordan Milner | Antoni Oko | Ryan Peter | Sylvain Sailly | Rachelle Sawatsky | Walter Scott | Krista Belle Stewart | Angela Teng | Mina Totino | Ron Tran | Tristan Unrau | Charlene Vickers | Brent Wadden | Alison Yip

Cover Image:Accumulation of Moments Spent Underwater With the Sun and Moon by Charlene Vickers is one of the works in Vancouver Special: Ambivalent Pleasures. Trevor Mills, Vancouver Art Gallery

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We Come to Witness: Sonny Assu in Dialogue with Emily Carr

We Come to Witness: Sonny Assu in Dialogue with Emily Carr
December 3, 2016 to April 23, 2017

Artist’s Tour: Sonny Assu
We Come to Witness: Sonny Assu in Dialogue with Emily Carr
Saturday December 3, 1pm & 3pm
In the Gallery, 4th floor

Join interdisciplinary artist Sonny Assu for a tour of his exhibition In Dialogue with Emily Carr: Sonny Assu. Challenging the colonial gaze, Assu merges Indigenous
iconography with a pop art sensibility to intervene into the work of Modernist painter Emily Car and her representations of the landscape and First Nations people. Assu will discuss select sculptural works, his ongoing series Interventions on the
Imaginary, which includes digital tags based on a selection of Carr paintings from the Vancouver Art Gallery’s collection and a new collaboration with ceramic artist
Brendan Tang.

Free for Members or with Gallery Admission.
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Sonny Assu
Spaced Invaders, 2014
digital intervention on an Emily Carr Painting (Heina, 1928)
Courtesy of the Artist

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Alumni Honoured with BC First Nations Art Awards

Emily Carr University is delighted to share news that alumni Xwalacktun (’82) and Luke Parnell (MAA ’12) have been awarded BC Creative Achievement Awards for First Nations Art. This annual award celebrates artistic excellence in traditional, contemporary or media art.

“These 2016 award recipients, continue a tradition of excellence in First Nations Art that the Foundation has had the privilege of honouring over the past decade. We thank Polygon Homes, its Chair, Michael Audain, and its President, Neil Chrystal, for their tremendous commitment and support of the BC Creative Achievement Awards for First Nations Art.”
Keith Mitchell, BC Achievement Foundation Chair

Emily Carr Honorary Doctorate recipient Susan Point, a Coast Salish artist from Musqueam, will receive this year’s Lifetime Achievement Award, an honour bestowed on individuals who have made a profound contribution to their First Nations culture.

2016 Recipients:

Corrine Hunt – Kwakiutl / Komoyue
Maxine Matilpi – Ma’mtagila / Tlowitsis
Corey W. Moraes – Lax Kw’alaams
Luke Parnell – Nisga’a / Haida
Xwalacktun – Coast Salish / Squamish / Kwakwaka’wakw

Members of the jury panel included: world renowned carver and teacher Stan Bevan; Aboriginal Program Director at Emily Carr University, Brenda Crabtree; the Museum of Anthropology’s Curator Emeritus, Bill McLennan; and celebrated curator and artist, Tania Willard.

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Boarder X

Boarder X
November 19, 2016 to April 23, 2017
Winnipeg Art Gallery

Boarder X features new work by Indigenous artists that use snowboarding, skateboarding, and surfing to demonstrate knowledge and relationships to the land. The artwork reflects cultural, political, environmental, and social perspectives related to the landscapes and territories we occupy. These boarding lifestyles share synergies with Indigeneity, connected by an appreciation for the land and water. The exhibit reveals how culture, art, and board intersect. In this context, board culture works to examine contested spaces, political borders, hybrid identities, and traditional territories.

Artists: Jordan Bennett, Roger Crait, Steven Davies, Mark Igloliorte, Mason Mashon, Meghann O’Brien, and Les Ramsay

Curated by Jaimie Isaac, WAG Curatorial Resident of Indigenous & Contemporary Art

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Aboriginal Program Manager Brenda Crabtree Honoured by BC Achievement Foundation

In recognition of the remarkable contributions of Brenda Crabtree and Bill McLennan to BC’s First Nations Art community, the BC Achievement Foundation has established an emerging artist award in their honour.

The Crabtree McLennan Emerging Artist Award will be formally announced on November 15th at the 10th annual BC Creative Achievement Awards for First Nations Art presentation ceremony in Vancouver. The award will be offered as part of the 2017 program.

Brenda and Bill have each supported the First Nations Art Award as jury members, collectively participating in 16 juries and, through their extraordinary efforts, elevated the work of 51 BC First Nation Artists over the past decade. In each of their respective work communities, they champion the artist and their work while offering mentorship and guidance to all. Their passion translates into meaningful accomplishments and inspires those with whom they connect.

The commitment of these two individuals mirrors the decade of excellence of the BC Creative Achievement Award in First Nations Art Lifetime Achievement recipients:

“…how these artistic leaders contribute to their communities, how they respect tradition, how they mentor the next generation, and how they transform reality. They ensure that BC is a place filled with astonishing craft, with unique and immensely expressive power, and continuous wonder.”

The Crabtree McLennan Emerging Artist award is a tribute to the life work of both Brenda and Bill and a legacy to inform the future of the community they serve.

Congratulations!

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