QAF_unsettling

Unsettling Colonial Gender Boundaries

Third year ECU Visual Arts student Lacie Kanerahtahsóhon Burning will be co-curating Unsettling Colonial Gender Boundaries with June Scudeler for Queer Arts Festival in partnership with Vancouver Indigenous Media Arts Festival.

Unsettling Colonial Gender Boundaries is the media art component of the festival that will feature commissioned works by Thirza Cuthand (ECU alumna) and Chandra Melting Tallow, as well as past work by Kent Monkman and Raven Davis.

After the show, Lindsay Nixon, Indigenous Editor-at-large for Canadian Art will moderate a panel discussion.

Unsettling Colonial Gender Boundaries
June 23 | 7:00pm | Roundhouse
Share
12963779_10205947615069402_1343515227450248086_n

Yaxkasei (William Callaghan) Memorial Award Endowed Fund

Emily Carr University of Art and Design has established the Yaxkasei (William Callaghan) Memorial Award Endowed Fund.  The award will be given to an Emily Carr student of Aboriginal ancestry wishing to enroll in a credit summer program course. The award will directly cover the cost of the student’s tuition and any remaining amount may be used for materials and supplies.

Yaxkasei, whose name means “can see a long way” was a third year Emily Carr student at the time of his tragic passing. Yaxkasei touched many lives in his short 33 years, including his four nephews, and was a beloved mentor and leader to Aboriginal students. Long-time Emily Carr community members Gaye Fowler and John Wertschek have established this award in honour of their friendship and respect for William “Yaxkasei” Callaghan, and Emily Carr University matched their contribution.

William

Share
feb3_sobey1

Aboriginal Alumni Longlisted for 2017 Sobey Art Award

The Sobey Art Foundation and the National Gallery of Canada today announced the longlist of nominees for the 2017 Sobey Art Award.
The Sobey Art Award is presented annually to a Canadian artist aged 40 and under who has exhibited in a public or commercial art gallery within 18 months of being nominated.
These 25 longlisted artists—five for each of five regions—are vying are for the top prize worth $50,000. Each of four other finalists will receive $10,000.
A related shortlist of five artists will be released on June 6, with the top winner of the prize being announced on October 25 in Toronto.

Congratulations to our Aboriginal Alumni on the longlist!

Jeneen Frei Njootli (2012)

Raymond Boisjoly (2006 | Assistant Professor, Audain Faculty Art)

Jeneen Frei Njootli is a Vuntut Gwich’in artist and a founding member of the ReMatriate Collective. In her interdisciplinary practice she uses media such as performance, sound and textiles. Much of her work deconstructs the history of the materials she uses. She investigates their relationship to trade, ceremonial regalia, and the politics of First Nations art. Her work is now in the Vancouver Art Gallery’s permanent collection.

Claiming-Space-Voices-of-Urban-Aboriginal-Youth

Raymond Boisjoly is an Indigenous artist of Haida and Québécois descent who lives and works in Vancouver. His work investigates technology, Aboriginal identity, the relationship between text and image as well as the limits of the visible. He is an Assistant Professor in the Audain Faculty of Art at Emily Carr University of Art + Design.

raymond-boisjoly

Share
IMG 6802 (retouched)

Edgar Heap of Birds to receive 2017 Honourary Doctorate

Each year the Honorary Doctorate Degree Program celebrates and recognizes the commitment, dedication, and service of individuals who are distinguished by their significant contributions and sustained creative and philanthropic achievements in their areas of expertise.

For over four decades, Hock E Aye Vi Edgar Heap of Birds has created visual works that deliver critiques on colonization, modernity, identity and power. A member of the Cheyenne and Arapaho tribes, he received a BFA from the University of Kansas, and an MFA from the Tyler School of Art in Philadelphia. Heap of Birds boasts an extensive exhibition record, including the Venice Biennale, and his works are held in the collections of major museums throughout North America including the Whitney, the Smithsonian, the MET, British Museum, and the Library of Congress.

A Professor of Native American Studies at the University of Oklahoma, Heap of Birds has served as a visiting lecturer and professor at numerous universities around the world, including Rhode Island School of Design and Yale University. His artistic creations and efforts as an advocate for indigenous communities worldwide are focused first upon social justice and then the personal freedom to live within the tribal circle as an expressive individual.

Share
Myre-Decolonial-Gesture-or-Doing-it-Wrong-Refair-le-chemin-2016”.-Courtesy-McCord-Museum-Montreal.-Photo-Marilyn-Aitken-x-895

Emily Carr Alumni and Faculty to Receive REVEAL Indigenous Art Awards

Several Emily Carr alumni and faculty will soon be receiving an award unlike any seen before in Canada. Created by the Hnatyshyn Foundation, the REVEAL Indigenous Art Awards are intended to honour emerging and established Indigenous artists and to fuel future Indigenous arts practice. Recipients will each receive a one-time award of $10,000.

Of the 150 artists selected, eight are Emily Carr alumni and faculty. The recipients were chosen by a national jury of peers and include visual artists, media artists, craftspeople, musicians, writers, storytellers, dancers and actors.

The winners will receive their awards on May 22 at a special ceremony in Winnipeg that will include National Chief Perry Bellegarde, Winnipeg mayor Brian Bowman and Canada Council CEO Simon Brault.

Join us in congratulating Sonny Assu (2002), Liz Carter (current student), Thirza Cuthand (2005), Mark Igloliorte (Assistant Professor, Faculty of Visual Art + Material Practice), Mary Longman (1989), Nadia Myre (1997), Janice Toulouse (1979 and Sessional Faculty) and Niki Watts (2016).

Find out more about the REVEAL Indigenous Art Awards here.

Cover Image: Decolonial Gesture or Doing it Wrong? Refair le chemin, 2016. Nadia Myre.

Share
ABORIGINALARTSHOW-33OUTLINED11x17-01

Annual Aboriginal Student Exhibition

Annual Aboriginal Student Exhibition
Re-Forming
March 24-April 3, 2017

Opening Reception
Friday, March 24 4:30-6:30pm
Concourse Gallery

Curatorial Brief:
Re-Forming desires to play on the word “form” as an aesthetic critique of a creative work while proposing a reformulation of fixed understandings of aesthetic as it relates to Indigenous artists and subject matter. As a suggestive device, this title asks the viewer to deepen their consideration of “what it means to be an Indigenous artist” versus “what it means to make art of Indigenous subject matter”, and to thoughtfully re-form initial, predetermined perspectives into something more generative and open. The process of re-forming as a practice in itself encourages an enriched critical engagement with the subtleties and nuances that exist for Indigenous artists and their creative practices. We want to highlight how Indigenous people are engaging with the reformation of culture, languages, politics and creative aesthetic and how that reformation allows a necessary shift in the relationships that our audiences have with us, our art and each other in the context of contemporary art.

This Years Student Curatorial Team:
Mallory Amirault -Mi’kmaq Metis
Nicole Preissl- Stolo
Veronica Danes- Gitxsan
Michelle Williams- Haida

ABORIGINALARTSHOW-33OUTLINED11x17-01

Share
205__600xfloat=left_shawnhunt

Shawn Hunt

Aboriginal Gathering Place Speaker Series

We are very pleased to present artist Shawn Hunt!
Aboriginal Gathering Place Speaker Series
Join us at the AGP on Friday March 10, 11:30-1pm.

Shawn Hunt was born in Vancouver Canada in 1975. He is an artist of Heiltsuk, French and Scottish ancestry. Shawn has a diploma in studio art from Capilano College as well as a BFA from the University of British Columbia where he majored in sculpture and drawing.

His father is Bradley Hunt, a prominent Heiltsuk artist with whom Shawn apprenticed for 5 yrs, learning wood and jewelry carving as well as traditional design. Shawn apprenticed with Coast Salish painter Lawrence Paul Yuxweluptun from 2012 to 2015.
His most recent exhibition Line as Language was at Burrard Arts Foundation, Vancouver and he has exhibited nationally and internationally.

http://www.shawnhunt.net/

image5

Share
C3hcamsUYAEEcB3.jpg_large

Kwèykw`áystway Visual Arts Exhibition

The 2017 Talking Stick Festival theme Kwèykw`áystway serves as inspiration for finding a wide variety of works by a number of artists whose visual practice communicates across media, Nations and generations.

Featuring a collection of artworks from 11 multidisciplinary artists of Indigenous ancestry, the exhibition Kwèykw`áystway: Speaking With One Another attempts to create generative spaces for contemplation and conversation using the variety of expression found in Indigenous art today. The Roundhouse Community Centre serves as the meeting place for you, the audience, to witness some of the voices belonging to the Indigenous arts community.

This exhibition includes a number of artists who come from varying areas of British Columbia or reside here. It seems only fitting to use the festival theme as the title for this show because it is this place – the unceded territory of the Coast Salish Nations – that brings us together today in celebration of art and culture. By using a language belonging to this region we recognize the traditional territory and deepen our relationship to the land around us.

Includes Emily Carr alumni and students:
Bracken Hanuse Corlett, Richard Heikkila-Sawan, Edwin Neel,
Levi Nelson, and Michelle Sound.

Opening & Reception
February 15th, 2017
7:00 PM

Exhibition
February 16-25, 2017
All Day

LOCATION: Roundhouse Exhibition Hall
(181 Roundhouse Mews, Vancouver, BC V6Z 2W3

C3hcamsUYAEEcB3.jpg_large

Share
b9d7db43e001eced6356e6c062a6c1bc

Terrance Houle

Aboriginal Gathering Place Speaker Series

We are very pleased to present  Terrance Houle!
Aboriginal Gathering Place Speaker Series
Join us at the AGP on Thursday February 16, 11:30am.

Born in Calgary, Alberta, Canada and raised on the Great Plains of North America, Terrance Houle is an internationally recognized interdisciplinary media artist and a proud member of the Kainai Nation (Blood Tribe).

Involved with Aboriginal communities all his life, he has traveled to reservations throughout North America participating in Powwow dancing and native ceremonies. Houle makes use of performance, photography, video & film, music and painting in his work. Likewise, Houle’s practice includes various tools of mass dissemination such as billboards and vinyl bus signage. ​

Houle graduated from the Alberta College of Art and Design in 2003 with a BFA Major in Fibre. His groundbreaking art quickly garnered him significant accolades and opportunities:

In 2003, Houle received an invitation to participate in the Thematic Residency at the Banff Centre for the Arts. This residency’s focus was on 34 international Indigenous people, exploring issues of colonization and communion.

In 2004, his work in short video & film presented was awarded Winner of Best Experimental Film at the Toronto ImagineNATIVE Film Festival.

In 2006, Houle received the Enbridge Emerging Artist Award, presented at the mayor’s luncheon for the arts.

Houle’s work has been exhibited across Canada, the United States, Australia, the UK and Europe.

Terrance Houle’s first major solo exhibition, GIVN’R, opened at PLUG-IN Institute for Contemporary Art in Winnipeg, Manitoba. GIVN’R is a small retro-exhibition of Terrance’s works in film, video, performance, installation, mixed media, and photography between the years of 2003 to 2009. ​

Houle lives and maintains his art practice in Calgary.

ba18d8e83001495c5fd4f8a660b17667

Share