gruben

Maureen Gruben QULLIQ: In Darkness, Light

Maureen Gruben
QULLIQ: In Darkness, Light

2 February to 15 April 2018
Opening Reception Thursday, Feb 1 at 7:30 pm
Artist walk-through Friday, Feb 2 at 12:00 pm

The Libby Leshgold Gallery is pleased to present QULLIQ: In Darkness, Light, a solo exhibition of new work by Maureen Gruben. The qulliq is a traditional oil lamp that was once the heart of the home. It was used to heat, to cook and to bring continuous light during the darkness of the Arctic winter. The new work included in this exhibition explores notions of light and transparency related to the light of the oil lamp as well as the translucence of ice.

Gruben forges critical links between threatened Arctic lands and communities, and international environmental and human conditions through disassembling and re-forming polar bear fur, moose hides, seal skins, gathered kelp. In her work, abstraction of form sits in active tension with the acutely ‘real’ presence of her geographically and culturally embedded mediums.

Gruben spent much of her childhood sewing with her mother, who was a seamstress, and trapping with her father. She has a tacit knowledge of Arctic land and the rich but increasingly precarious resources it offers. Frequently addressing themes such as Persistent Organic Pollutants (POPs), melting ice, and the rights of indigenous hunters to maintain their way of life, Gruben’s practice is permeated with activism while at the same time allowing generous room for her materials themselves to speak. While referring explicitly inwards to localised acts of hunting, gathering, communal preparation and sharing—and even to individual animals—her work, equally, extends decisively outwards, exploring new visual languages that offer compelling and often urgent global associations.

Maureen Gruben is based in Victoria, BC and Tuktoyaktuk, NWT. She was born in Tuktoyaktuk and studied at Kelowna Okanagan College of Fine Arts (Diploma in Fine Arts, 1990), the Enʼowkin Centre in Penticton (Diploma in Fine Arts and Creative Writing, 2000 and Certificate in Indigenous Political Development & Leadership, 2001), and University of Victoria (BFA, 2012). She has been recognized by Kelownaʼs En’owkin Centre with both their Eliza Jane Maracle Award (1998/99) and their Overall Achievement Award (1999/2000). In 2011 she was awarded the Elizabeth Valentine Prangnell Scholarship Award from the University of Victoria. Gruben has most recently exhibited in the group shows Blink at University of Victoria (2012) and Custom Made at Kamloops Art Gallery (2015), 150 Acts: Art, Activism, Impact at Art Gallery of Guelph (2017-18), and as part of Landmarks/Reperes2017; her first solo show, UNGALAQ (When Stakes Come Loose) opened at Vancouver’s grunt gallery in 2017.

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lburning

Lacie Burning artist talk

Spark Artist Talks is an informal lunchtime artist talk series hosted by grunt gallery in the Native Education College longhouse on the third Thursday of each month. This event features emerging Indigenous artists with diverse practices ranging from animation to street art, spoken word to sculpture. Bring your bagged lunch or grab some home cookin’ from the NEC’s canteen and join the fireside conversation about what inspires artists.

Artist Biography:
Lacie Burning is a Kanien’kehá:ka (Mohawk) and Onondaga (patrilineally) artist and curator raised on the Six Nations of the Grand River located in Southern Ontario. They work in photography, video, installation, and sculpture and are currently in their third year of studies in the Visual Fine Arts program at Emily Carr University of Art + Design. Having come from a culturally and politically grounded upbringing, their work focuses on politics of Indigeneity and identity from a Haudenosaunee perspective.
https://burning.live/

Thursday, January 18 at 12:15 PM – 1 PM
Native Education College
285 East 5th Avenue, Vancouver, British Columbia V5T 1H2

Land/Body/Reciprocity 
Smashing the mirror to call our bodies home
by Lacie Burning and Lindsay Nixon in Canadian Art Magazine.

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ECU Community Talking Circle

Tuesday, January 23, 2018 – 11:30am – 12:30pm

Aboriginal Gathering Place | Room C2290, 2nd floor

Join us and share your experiences now that we’ve wrapped up the first semester in our new home.

The Aboriginal Gathering Place is hosting a Community Talking Circle with guests Ron Burnett and Bonne Zabolotney. This is an opportunity to learn from our shared past and move forward to a renewed future.

Squamish cultural leader Gene Harry will welcome everyone and Laura Lee Way Laq will facilitate the Talking Circle.

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MOA: Fabric of Our Land: Salish Weaving

Sunday November 19
Free admission 12 – 5 p.m.
Remarks and presentations 1:15 p.m.
Join the event on Facebook

Musqueam and the Museum of Anthropology invite you to celebrate the opening of The Fabric of Our Land, an exhibit that will take you on a journey of over 200 years of Salish weaving.

This is a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to see some of the earliest Salish hand-woven blankets in existence. On loan from museums in Europe and the United States, these stunning weavings will give visitors an up-close view of rare Salish designs that we hope inspire you to learn more about the rich histories of this cultural practice.

This exhibit seeks to support contemporary weavers engaged in the ongoing revitalization of Salish weaving. Throughout the duration of the exhibit, visitors will have opportunities to experience weaving by trying it themselves. This exhibit will be on view in MOA’s Audain Gallery from November 19 2017 to April 15 2018.

$2 PARKING: Use coupon code FABRIC at the pay station from 12 p.m. onward.

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ITCNOV

November Indigenous Talking Circle

The Aboriginal Gathering Place + Emily Carr Students’ Union are hosting another Indigenous Talking Circle for the Fall semester. Join us for respectful conversation and bannock & jam. Wednesday, November 15 at 11:30am Aboriginal Gathering Place.

Panelists include: Mark Igloliorte, Lacie Burning and Marc Williams.

ITCNOV

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Mark Igloliorte: sightlines and surfaces

In preparation for several major projects this fall, boundary pushing Vancouver-based painter Mark Igliolorte discusses his ongoing research into the Indigenous origins of the kayak, the beauty in shifting perspectives and collapsing the vast distance between coasts. Through the careful observation of sightlines and surfaces, Igliolorte’s art makes visible the latent Indigeneity of skateboards and kayaks in his ongoing and lived practice that reframes cultural histories and sense of place.

Read full article here : http://iaq.inuitartfoundation.org/29-3-sightlines-and-surfaces/

IMG_2198-CMYK-398x530Mark Igloliorte MyYellow Aquanaut 17’ 7” (View with artist standing on skateboard), 2016, Cut grippe on skateboard deck. Photo courtesy the artist.

Cover image: Temporary Studio, 2016, Aboriginal Gathering Place – Emily Carr University of Art + Design. Photo courtesy the artist.

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ashoona

Shuvinai Ashoona

Aboriginal Gathering Place Speaker Series

We are very pleased to present artist  Shuvinai Ashoona!
Aboriginal Gathering Place Speaker Series
Join us at the AGP on Wednesday October 11, 2:30-3:30pm.

Shuvinai Ashoona was born in 1961 in Cape Dorset on Baffin Island. She is the daughter of the well-known sculptor Kiawak Ashoona and granddaughter of the late Pitseolak Ashoona, the great graphic artist. Her own career started in the mid-1990s when she began making drawings for the West Baffin Eskimo Cooperative. Often startlingly different from other Cape Dorset graphic expression, her works have not always been readily accepted by collectors of Inuit art. Nevertheless, in recent years Ashoona’s reputation as a contemporary artist has steadily grown.

Ashoona’s first works were small monochromatic ink drawings depicting the land. Many of these works show receding expanses of rocky tundra with sparse vegetation; streams run over the land in some images, often turning into small waterfalls. Although a few works show a horizon, the majority look down upon the landscape from a nearly aerial, closed off perspective. Atmospheric and delicately detailed, these early drawings are often characterized by a subtle eeriness.

In the late 1990s, Ashoona’s images became less naturalistic and darker in mood. Works based more on imagination than on observation of the physical world started to appear, suggesting a strong inner vision. Many drawings from this period portray subterrnean caverns littered with boulders and spanned by twisting formations. Darkened or illuminated tunnels also appear frequently, as do step- and shelf-like forms. These psychologically charged works are densely and sometimes obsessively drawn. Recently, Ashoona has started to use a range of colour in her images, depicting people and common objects but in her own unique vision, often including textual commentary. While lighter in mood, these works remain obliquely representational in a manner distinctly hers.

3Ashoona_Scary_Dream

 

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PB

Pushing Boundaries Exhibition

This biennial exhibition showcases and celebrates contemporary local, national and international First Nations artists. Through carvings, portraiture drawings, digital images, textile work, video and more, themes of family, reconciliation, indigenous life, gender, race, politics and nature are explored.

Artists:

Arlene Bowman, Allison Burns, Krystle Coughlin, Alanna Edwards, Dan Friday, Geronimo, Whess Harman, Adele Maskwa-iskwew Arseneau, Shelley McDonald, Ryan McKenna, Levi Nelson, Jacqueline Primeau, Michelle Sound

North Vancouver Community Arts Council

Located at
CityScape Community Art Space
335 Lonsdale Avenue
North Vancouver, BC
PB

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Crimp in the Fabric: Situating Painting Today

Crimp in the Fabric: Situating Painting Today

This symposium is an opportunity for artists, writers, curators, students, educators and thinkers to come together, and question the relevance and importance of painting today. It will be an opportunity to listen to and discuss issues arising from various and diverse artistic positions represented by panelists, in the context of the many concurrent painting exhibitions occurring throughout Vancouver.
https://crimpinthefabric.ca/

Panel including ECU faculty Mark Igloliorte: September 29, SFU Woodwards

Like Hands Stuck in a Mattress: The Difficulty of Talking Painting

Asks the questions: How to talk about painting? How not to talk about painting? And given that painting is the most important thing that painters do, (why) should painters talk about painting anyway?

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